Why this Blog Exists

To make the case for expanding the Park Slope Historic District

Wednesday, June 23, 2010

South Slope's Red Door Club

288-286 14th Street

Not long ago, the New York Times quoted real estate broker Roslyn Huebener on the highly specialized market for wood-frame houses in Brooklyn's brownstone belt:

“Wood frames are not for everyone,” Ms. Huebener said. “But most people who want wood frame will do whatever they can to get them. There’s that cult of wood-frame buyers.” -NY Times, November 27, 2009

267 14th Street

Most of Park Slope's old wood frame houses are found in the South Slope, probably because the city's "fire limits" (the boundary within which it was illegal to erect a wood house) arrived here relatively late, allowing more time for them to be built. Many of these houses are visible on the 1880 Bromley Brooklyn Atlas and thus can be dated to the 1870s or earlier.

330 12th Street

A particular sub-group of the wood-frame house cult are those with doors painted red, such as the ones pictured above and below. The bright red door makes for a striking contrast to the painted wood clapboards.

349 13th Street

223 14th Street

Even the occasional brick house appears to be making a bid to enter the red-door club:

413 10th Street

What do you think? Should brick houses be allowed in? Or should the Red Door Club be reserved exclusively for wood-frame houses?

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